08 September 2014

mending quilts

Mending quilts at the cabin and at home.
A 1970s applique 'umbrella'. I had no problem re-attaching some handles and fixing the hem,
but, at least one half of the hand embroidered  herring bone stitch outline has come out.

 Fortunately I am a dab hand with herring bone and the umbrella I redid with doubled sewing thread zipped quickly along.

Just look at what I found at home in one of my crammed sewing boxes  ......a nice ball of medium weight, just the right brown floss. German by the looks of it, most likely 1950s. I shall take it to the cabin tonight  along with a couple of old embroidery hoops.

A wool, tied quilt that I generally call a ' working mans ' quilt, perhaps made for the help in the barn. Somewhat worse for wear and I am not sure that I can do much with it.

But..... was it a quilt for the help in the barn?  Taking of the side bindings reveal that it was not the plain rayon I had thought but a rich, royal purple chenille.

  A dull mauve wool was obviously purple at one point also , most likely home dyed.,


So much can be learnt from a good unpick!


  1. Fascinating. I love the stories behind hand made quilts.

    1. wish I knew the real strory. I am debating re binding is a strong rich colour ( please do not suggest I buy retail) or just turning over the back to bind, It is a faded pink wool, but it IS part of the original quilt.

  2. I admire you Jan - I hate mending anything.

  3. I find it relaxing (well,sort of) and I feel that I am 'working'

  4. The umbrella quilt is an unusual pattern (at least it's not one I've seen before)...rather unusual colourway too. It definitely takes patience to repair all the old pieces, but such a worthwhile expenditure of time.

  5. I have had ' umbrella' or 'parasol' once before, It cane from a house in 'The Beach' now part of GTA, where folks would go on the streetcar from Toronto to a summer home in the summer.


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